Wednesday, 25 September 2013

In case you missed it....

Apologies for the lack of  posting over the last few days, I've been taking a break interstate, including collecting my Year of Faith Indulgence for a visit to one's baptismal Church.

But while I've been away a number of people have alerted me to some items of note, many thanks for these.  Some of those warrant a post to themselves, so I'll post on those over the next few days.

In the meantime though, a few short points of note, just in case you missed them.

New Archbishop of Tasmania on female altar servers and vocations

The new Archbishop of Hobart, +Julian Porteous was duly installed in his Cathedral last week.  Do keep him in your prayers; he faces a tough task indeed.

The Archbishop made a strong start, though, by signalling the importance of promoting vocations through the use of male altar servers (though for some reason he doesn't extend this to girls of primary school age, which I would have thought was the most crucial age for forming attitudes, both for girls and boys).

The need for a clear message on vocations is obvious given that the Archdiocese, which takes in the whole of Tasmania, now has less than 25 diocesan priests (2012) - and according to the Archdiocese's vocations director, half of those are retired!  Unsurprisingly, there were the screams of outrage from Tasmania's secularist mafia.

In an interview with The Mercury he suggested his other priorities were public engagement (in the face of Tasmania's Green-Labor Government death agenda that should prove interesting indeed), and attracting people to the faith and back to Mass (again an obvious priority given that at last count, Mass attendance in Tasmania was down to a pathetic 7.1% according to a recent article in The Swag).  He also promised to convert to Tasmania's other religion, viz Aussie Rules football.

Fr Reynolds laicized and excommunicated

You may recall the story of Melbourne's Fr Greg Reynolds of the dog given communion scandal - he left the priesthood over his heretical views on women's ordination, homosexuality and other subjects, and then proceeded to set up his own 'inclusive Church' parish.   Archbishop Hart suspended him, but for some reason did not take the next step of excommunicating him and his congregation.

Well now, at last, proper action has been taken by Rome, and he has been both excommunicated and laicized.  The Age story claims that Archbishop Hart had not requested either the laicisation or excommunication.  Sad if true.  Laicization of course can only be done by Rome.  But bishops have both the power and the duty to act on their own initiative to prevent scandal and the confusion of the laity.

New Ordinariate parish for Melbourne

On the more positive news front, I've been alerted by a reader to the news that a second Ordinariate parish is to be established in Melbourne.  The Ordinariate parish of St Edmund Campion will be based at St Patrick's Mentone, and is to be launched on 6 October.

The parish will use the newly approved Anglican Use of the Roman Rite, and hope to have weekday as well as Sunday Masses, monthly Evensong, and more.  All Catholics can, of course, receive communion and fulfill their Sunday obligation at Ordinariate Masses.

Canberra Church loses heritage protection

Canberra readers in particular may remember the fight to stop the Archdiocese selling the only Church located in one of Canberra's town centres, St Patrick's Braddon, in order to finance the commercial development of the Cathedral precinct.  The price offered for the site was deemed too low so the deal fell through a few months back,

However, as one tactic in the fight and in order to prevent any future such attempts to get rid of the Church, parishioners and friends of the Church, which is still in active use, sought heritage protection for the Church.  This has now been knocked back.

I have to admit I'm in two minds about this.  On the one hand, selling off an active Church, and one that makes the Church visible in the city and provides a much needed lunchtime Mass for city workers at that, seems an outrageous decision.

But if heritage protection had been granted, it would have locked the Church into its rather ugly current 1960s wreckovated style of interior.

Perhaps our new Archbishop might now, instead of trying to close down and sell off the site, consider making it into a visible centre of outreach for the New Evangelization?

The Church could easily be beautified by a few simple steps like ripping out the horrible carpet, and returning the altar to its original position at the end of the Church rather than stuck awkwardly in the middle near the entrance.  It could then be turned it into a 24 hour Adoration chapel, perhaps with a soup kitchen or similar outreach services to the homeless of the city (there is a disused convent behind it)...

3 comments:

jeff said...

Wait a minute... so the new Arch of Tassie who wants altar BOYS is still happy with altar Tomboys if of primary school age? A slight improvement..i suppose

Anonymous said...

There are many who worship at St Patrick's and dont want to see it closed. This church had the opportunity under Heritage status to be upgraded including replacing the green carpet. Heritage is not so restrictive. All Saints Ainslie and St Johns Anglican Church Reid have both been extensively renovated using Heritage grants. What a waste of opportunity and gain for the greedy developers.
Patrick Braddon.


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Anonymous said...

There are many who worship at St Patrick's and dont want to see it closed. This church had the opportunity under Heritage status to be upgraded including replacing the green carpet. Heritage is not so restrictive. All Saints Ainslie and St Johns Anglican Church Reid have both been extensively renovated using Heritage grants. What a waste of opportunity and gain for the greedy developers.
Patrick Braddon.


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