Monday, 27 October 2008

And so it begins...

Thanks to correspondent Peter for alerting me to this news item from the AAP via the ABC, about the Greens - supported by House Speaker, the Islamic Council and assorted hangers-on - are trying to get the practice of reciting the Lord's Prayer to start Parliament each day - abandoned.

Very apposite to the Feast of Christ the King celebrated yesterday in the traditional rite:

"The Federal Government and Opposition have both given the thumbs down to calls to change or abandon the Lord's Prayer recited at the beginning of each day of federal Parliament.

But the Greens want the prayer replaced with a period of reflection and a conscience vote in both houses on the issue.

Speaker of the House of Representatives, Harry Jenkins, has called for a public debate about whether the daily prayer should be rewritten or replaced. He said the prayer was the most controversial aspect of parliamentary procedure and had been raised with him by MPs and members of the public.

His call has been met with protests from the Australian Christian Lobby and expressions of support for the prayer from Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and Opposition Leader Malcolm Turnbull.

A spokeswoman for Mr Rudd said the Prime minister viewed the prayer as an important tradition that should not be broken. "The Lord's Prayer is a long-standing tradition of the Australian Parliament and the Prime Minister believes it should continue," she said.

Opposition Leader Malcolm Turnbull and Nationals leader Warren Truss issued a joint statement, saying the removal of the prayer would be unacceptable. The pair said media reports today were the first time the matter had been raised with the Coalition.

"The Lord's Prayer has a very important place in the conduct of the parliamentary program, and ahead of the day's debate and deliberations it provides a non-partisan reaffirmation of our commitment to the common good for the people of Australia," Mr Turnbull and Mr Truss said in the statement.

Greens leader Bob Brown said a period of reflection would be better than the "old fashioned" rote recitation of the prayer.

He wants a conscience vote in both houses on the issue.

"I am repeatedly dismayed that we have people going through prayers by rote about being good to each other then immediately getting into the business of attacking each other in the Senate," Senator Brown said.
"I think it would be better if we had a period of reflection in which people could think about such things as 'will what we are doing today be welcomed by our grandchildren?'

"The matter should be debated and there should be a free vote on it."

Senator Brown said he would discuss moving a joint motion with independent MP, Rob Oakeshott, whom earlier this month used his maiden speech to call for a daily acknowledgement of the Aboriginal owners of the land.

Australian Christian Lobby managing director Jim Wallace said Christianity had had a profound impact on shaping our laws, culture and democracy.

"It's appropriate that we open parliaments with the Lord's Prayer for its cultural and historic relevance," he said.

Australian Federation Of Islamic Councils president Ikebal Patel said the prayer should be non-denominational and include a recognition of the Indigenous owners of the land.

"Any prayer before a session of the Parliament is good but what I would encourage is some words to acknowledge the land we are on, the Indigenous spirituality.

"Acknowledging the many other religions that Australia encompasses certainly, I think, would be a more inclusive prayer," he said.

Immigration Minister Chris Evans said the Indigenous owners of the land were acknowledged at the opening of Parliament for the year and would be recognised at other official occasions at Parliament House."

Nice to have it set out so clearly who is working on the side of the forces of evil...

6 comments:

Joshua said...

Speaking of Christus Rex, I think it essential that it be celebrated on its appointed October day, because otherwise the Kingdom of Christ is reduced - as in most preaching - to some advent of niceness at the end of time (as opposed to the Last Judgement).

The Vespers hymn "Te sæculorum Principem" says it all, in the following verses:

Scelésta turba clámitat :
Regnáre Christum nólumus :
Te nos ovántes ómnium
Regem suprémum dícimus.
...
Te natiónum Præsides
Honóre tollant público,
Colant magístri, júdices,
Leges et artes éxprimant.

(Through Sin with rebel voice maintain,
We will not have this Christ to reign,
Far other, Lord, shall be our cry,
Who hail thee King of kings most High.
...
(Earth's noblest rulers to thee raise
Their homage due of public praise;
Teachers and judges thee confess;
Art, science, law, thy truth express.)

Unsurprisingly, even in the Latin edition of the new Office, these verses are deleted.

Louise said...

Greens leader Bob Brown said a period of reflection would be better than the "old fashioned" rote recitation of the prayer.

He wants a conscience vote in both houses on the issue.

"I am repeatedly dismayed that we have people going through prayers by rote about being good to each other then immediately getting into the business of attacking each other in the Senate," Senator Brown said.


Yeah, because a period of reflection will make for nicer parliamentarians. Sure.

He knows exactly what he's doing - he is working against the Christian tradition of the nation.

Cardinal Pole said...

This latest development is interesting from many angles.

Says Sen. Brown:
"I think it would be better if we had a period of reflection in which people could think about such things as 'will what we are doing today be welcomed by our grandchildren?"

Hmmm, where to begin ...

Firstly, Sen. Brown is a sodomite, so presumably he doesn't mean his children. In any case his party is unreservedly pro-abortion, so whether or not the grandchildren welcome what he does, he certainly won't be welcoming the grandchildren. And of course, more grandchildren means more carbon footprints.

Furthermore, let's have a little 'period of reflection' on what sort of society our grandchildren would inherit if, say, the Greens had become the government at the last election and carried out their agenda. Then again, let's not. It would be a hell on earth, a morass of misery, euthanasia, abortion, sodomy and disease.

The other thing that's interesting about this is the informal alliance between the secularists and the Muslims. Remember when a certain Islamic spokesman argued that Australian law ought to recognise polygamy and he suggested a connection between this and 'gay marriage'? As we know, the difference between the Christian and Muslim deities is that the Former can neither lie nor sin, and even if He let the present created order cease to exist and created a whole new one, He could not create a new moral order. Yet the Muslim deity is supposedly the creator, not only of 'all things visible and invisible', but even of morality. Even in the present moral order, as H.H. The Pope famously pointed out, the Muslim deity can contravene his own moral order and command one to commit idolatry, for instance. This fits in perfectly with the secularist conception of conscience; for the secularists, morality is not merely recognising a law and abiding by it, since they posit a creative role for conscience. The secularists and the Muslims have a lot more in common with each other than a penchant for the colour green.

I might finish by noting that The Australian has a sensible editorial on the matter (including a nice little swipe at 'inclusive language'):
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24555488-25209,00.html

Cardinal Pole said...

P.S. Reading Joshua's comment got me thinking, particularly this portion:

"Earth's noblest rulers to thee raise
Their homage due of public praise;
Teachers and judges thee confess ..."

I wonder whether there is a single Australian Ordinary who would agree that the State ought to confess Christ? Could anyone name one?

Joshua said...

From Lauds of Christus Rex:
- a stanza of the hymn:

O ter beáta cívitas
Cui rite Christus ímperat,
Quæ jussa pergit éxsequi
Edícta mundo cælitus!

(That civic state, how trebly blest,
Where Christ bears rule by man confessed;
There edicts of high heaven run;
There upon earth God's will is done.)

- Ant. 5. Gens et regnum quod non servíerit tibi, períbit: et Gentes solitúdine vastabúntur.

(The nation and kingdom that will not serve Thee shall perish; and [those] nations shall be utterly wasted.)

What shall be Australia's choice?

It has long seemed to me that the horror of multiplied abortion, wilful murders all crying out for vengeance to Almighty God, can but kindle His wrath and draw down ruin upon our nation.

Anonymous said...

Yes, I do.

+ Thomas Wolsey

Archieps. Eborac., etc